Keeping the (scientific) predators out of your aquaculture

With just over half of all the world’s seafood now coming from aquaculture, the industry is increasingly relying on science for sustainable growth and innovations. While more science is becoming freely available to aquaculturalists, policy makers, managers and other stakeholders, new research led by Dr Jeff Clements (DFO Gulf Fisheries Centre, Canada) suggests that some of this “open-access” aquaculture science is not quite what it seems.

Traditionally, science articles have been kept behind paywalls by publishers, only available to those who subscribe to the journal or pay for access to an individual article. But in the case of open-access research, authors are charged a fee to publish instead.

“Accessing science is expensive,” Clements explains. “Open-access scientific publishing is a recent adoption by the scientific community to make peer-reviewed content freely available to anyone on the internet.”

Sadly, some seek to exploit the open-access model to make easy money. Popularly known as “predatory journals”, these journals are less rigorous about what they do and do not publish...

This article was written for (and can be read in full at) The Fish Site.

 

 Diagrammatic of three major ways in which predatory open access publishing threatens aquaculture research. Credit: Clements  et al  (2018) ( CC BY 4.0 ).

Diagrammatic of three major ways in which predatory open access publishing threatens aquaculture research. Credit: Clements et al (2018) (CC BY 4.0).