Ocean Oculus is here to bring you some of the best science & stories from the sea

Behind Ocean Oculus is Samantha Andrews - a marine biologist/ecologist and experienced science communicator (that's me in the photo just below).

As a scientist, I am fascinated by those mobile marine critters that travel throughout the ocean, and how we can take better care of them.

When I’m not busy doing my own science, I can be found talking to people or writing about the ocean, its inhabitants, ocean people and industry, and marine science in all their splendor – including right here in my News from the Sea.

Interested in working with me? Have a question? Want to chat about something? Get in touch.

 
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“HUMAN BEINGS MAKE LIFE SO INTERESTING. DO YOU KNOW, THAT IN A UNIVERSE SO FULL OF WONDERS, THEY HAVE MANAGED TO INVENT BOREDOM." - Death (Terry Pratchett, The Hogfather)

Well lets face it, science is awesome, and the ocean - incredible! Why would I not want to share some of this wonder with everyone?  Whether delivering public talks for organisations like The Marine Conservation Society, writing for industry/trade publications like IMarEST's The Marine Professional, for NGO's like The Sustainable Food Trust, lifestyle magazines like The Jersey Life, science-centered publications like Biosphere, popular online magazines like Hakai, or white paper publications for organisations like the IMO, topics I cover include:

  • Marine protected areas
  • Fisheries, aquaculture, and sustainable seafood
  • Ocean management
  • Climate change, ocean acidification, and the oceans
  • Ocean life and ecosystems
  • Human-centered stories
  • Pollution and litter
  • Management and sustainable use
  • Ocean industries
  • Technology for ocean science and sustainability
  • Public engagement in science
  • Ocean literacy

Any facilitated discussions or workshops I run, or articles I write on science communication look beyond the ocean, and are designed to be relevant to participants. Depending on the needs of the participants, he focus may be on a specific branch of science, a particular style of communication, or may be more general.

Let's work together!

Whether you are looking for an experienced science communicator to write for a professional or popular publication, produce a policy document, speak for a school, grass-roots, policy, or industry event, run a workshop, facilitate a discussion, or science communication training, do not hesitate to get in touch to discuss your needs.

    Credit: Karen Cox/ Flickr (CC BY-ND 2.0)

    Credit: Karen Cox/ Flickr (CC BY-ND 2.0)

    The Printed word

    Whether for online or in print for industry, professional or trade publications, popular media, specialist magazines, interest groups, blog, government, or policy, my writing combines evidence-based science with the words, language, and context that matter to the audience. 

    Credit: Herbert G. Ponting, National Geographic (Public Domain)

    Credit: Herbert G. Ponting, National Geographic (Public Domain)

    tHE SPOKEN WORD

    Workshops, discussions, speaking special interest groups, industry, or trade events, field trips for kids or adults, or even being interviewed for media outlets, the power of personal interaction and storytelling brings about new understanding - and new solutions.

    Pixabay (CC0)

    Pixabay (CC0)

    THE SOCIAL WORD

    Short sharp science, feature pieces, audio and visual, my social media activity targets both the specialist and non-specialist alike. The goal is to share science, foster understanding, and engage audiences across the globe - and learn a little more about the wonders of the world myself.

    "Not all those who wander are lost" ~ J. R. R. Tolkien

    Life in all its forms is both wondrous an mysterious. For me, I am hooked on those animals that travel through the ocean - those mobile species, the migratory species, that on one day may be found in one location, but on another in a completely different area.  There are many of such species in our ocean. Humpback whales move between Costa Rica and Antarctica – a 5,160 mile journey, whilst leatherback turtles move some 12,744 miles between the west coast of the United States of America and Indonesia. Meanwhile Arctic terns have been tracked flying from the Farne Islands all the way down to Antarctica – a whopping 59,600 mile trip. In addition, many species undergo what is known as ontogenetic migration – basically moving between different habitats at different times in an animal’s life. Salmon begin their life in rivers and streams before heading out to the ocean – and returning again to breed. Juvenile John’s snapper travel from coastal water to large mangrove estuaries and then travel offshore. Similarly, when young Atlantic cod can take advantage of the shelter found in coastal seagrass meadows before moving out into deeper waters. 

    My specialist interest crosses several disciplines (and sub-disciplines) - spatial ecology, movement ecology, migratory ecology, oceanography, climate change science to name a few. These help answer fundamental questions like why a particular species, population, or even individual is where it is at any give time. Where will it be tomorrow, in a month, in six months, in a year - and why? What will happen as the ocean continues to warm, as oxygen levels in parts of the seas decline, as ocean acidification increases? Who will adapt and cope with the changing conditions, who will find new homes and new migration routes, who will find nowhere to go? What will these changes mean for other animals these mobile populations interact with - including people who fish the ocean for food and livelihoods?

    Using this information we can look to take better care of our ocean, lightening our impact on those species - and those livelihoods - at risk from activities that may harm them.  What kinds of spatial management - like sanctuaries or targeted management zones - will work best to achieve our goals? Do we need networks of sanctuaries? What tools like those designed to reduce accidental catch are also useful in a given situation? And my personal favourite - how can we implement a dynamic ocean management approach - spatial management that reacts rapidly to the changing dynamics of the ocean and its inhabitants to reduce negative interactions with mobile species that don't like to stay in the same place, or that are shifting in response to the changing ocean climate. 

    Credit: Pixabay (CC0)

    Credit: Pixabay (CC0)

    Credit: Pixabay (CC0)

    Credit: Pixabay (CC0)

    Credit: Pixabay (CC0)

    Credit: Pixabay (CC0)

    Interested in working with me? Have a question? Want to chat about something? Feel free to get in touch by which ever method you like

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